Capsule Wardrobe · Pattern Review · simply by ti fabrics · True Bias Pattern

Hudson Pants by True Bias with Simply by Ti fabrics

I am sharing more today about expanding my Capsule Pajama wardrobe.  I shared an introduction to this adventure in this post.  The pattern that I’m talking about today is the Hudson Pants by True Bias.  In the previous post I shared about my wearable muslin.  In today’s post I will be sharing about two additional pairs of pants that I’ve made.

The parameters that I included for these pants for my #capsulepajamas project are:

  • Use knit fabrics.
  • Use patterns in stash (the Hudson pants became a part of my pattern stash after the last post).
  • Sew with fabrics that are within my capsule colors.  Black is one of the colors that I’ve picked for my color palette.  The oatmeal color is straying a bit from the palette that I shared in this post, but it’s a neutral color so I thought it would be fun to throw in.

(Disclaimer,  The fabrics share in this post were a part of my Fabric Ambassador* project and were given to me to share with you.  I selected the colors and fabric base and the opinions that I’m sharing are my own.)

Size:  View A, I started with a size 8 at the waist and graded up to a 10 at the hips down through the cuff.

HUDSON+BIG+CARTEL+INFO-01

Fabric: Oatmeal Baby French Terry and Black Baby French Terry.  Both are the same fabric base but one is an oatmeal color and the other is a lovely black tone.  The fabric is quite soft and has a lovely drape.  If you haven’t worked with baby french terry yet, I’d highly recommend you give it a try!  Think terry cloth fabric but the baby terry has a finer loop structure on the wrong side of the fabric so it is softer and has a very nice drape.

Pattern:  The one change that I made to these two pairs of pants (from the pattern) is that I lengthened the leg 1.5″.  I don’t enjoy wearing pants that feel too short, so I enjoyed this length for a little extra fabric in the legs.

The fabric that I picked is super soft and has amazing drape but it ended up being slightly thin for pants that I would wear out of the house.  They make super comfortable pajama pants (and would be comfortable to wear in warmer weather) but I would stick with thicker fabrics for pants that I would wear out of the house (like regular French Terry or Ponte Roma fabrics).

Photo Feb 12, 2 05 25 PM

I sewed the black pair of pants first and then the oatmeal pair second.  With the drape being so high on this fabric, I found as I was sewing the black version that the pocket was a bit challenging to smoothly sew to the waistband.  As I started the second pair in the oatmeal fabric I decided to add white stretch interfacing on the wrong side of the pocket pieces to help stabilize the pockets.  This helped make a much smoother finish at the waistband (although you can see that the pockets look slightly thicker through the pants in the photos).

Photo Feb 12, 2 04 26 PM

Future plans with the fabric: I would love to try the baby french terry fabric again in a different application.  I think a top would be quite lovely or even a flowy dress would be a fun application as well.

Future plans with the pattern: I have not sewn this pattern yet in a woven fabric.  I have a pair of commercial pants that I purchased at a thrift store that I’m saving to make a future pair of these pants.  I also haven’t tried making View B (the ankle version) and I think that would be quite fun to make a shorter/capri length for spring.

I will say, this pattern has been quite a surprise to me.  Initially I didn’t think it was for me and now I’ve become quite obsessed with it.  That is a great reminder to me, branch out and try new styles from time to time.

Simply by Ti brand ambassador graphic

*As a Simply by Ti Fabric Ambassador I receive complementary fabric from the Simply By Ti shop to use for a project to write about and share with you.

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5 thoughts on “Hudson Pants by True Bias with Simply by Ti fabrics

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